Tesla Model 3 doesn’t have a key – and seven other things we learned

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Elon Musk’s new mass market-aimed electric car has no directly visible speedometer, comes in two battery versions and isn’t a bad option for a sleep

Elon Musk revealed Tesla’s Model 3 is unlocked by a smartphone and doesn’t have a traditional key or fob among a host of other details at the delivery event for the first 30 mass-market electric cars over the weekend.

As the Model 3 enters what Musk called “six months of manufacturing hell” as Tesla ramps up production to meet the more than 500,000 pre-orders, one of the most surprising titbits is that there is no traditional key to open and start Tesla’s mass-market electric car hope.

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Electric cars are pollution shifters: we will need huge investment in generation capacity | Letters

http://ift.tt/2vjHSsV vehicle charging will be the equivalent of running an electric shower for hours on end, argues Colin Read

There seems to be little understanding of the simple fact that electric vehicles (EV) are, in the main, pollution shifters – from tailpipe to power generation facility (Ban from 2040 on diesel and petrol car sales, 26 July). The electricity generation and transmission system is already tested to its limits during a harsh winter. Only if objections disappeared to the mass building of thousands of the largest wind turbines, plus similar numbers of hectares of photovoltaic solar generation, could the pollution shifters’ argument be refuted. Even then, there would still be need for conventional or nuclear generation for when the sun doesn’t shine and wind doesn’t blow – doubling the capital requirement.

Then there is the transmission system. Its capacity is based on “averaging”. It assumes that not everyone will be using the full load available to their house at the same time. Each EV charging station takes minimum 3.3kW for around 12 hours – or 7.2kW for fast charging. It would be the equivalent of every house having an electric shower in service for many hours, all at the same time. The distribution system is simply not designed to cope with these simultaneous loads. If the government is serious about no new hydrocarbon-fuelled cars after 2040, we would need to start a programme of upgrades or replacement to the entire electricity distribution system.

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MG GS review: ‘a budget crossover resembling a Qashqai’

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Call it Morris dancing, but this new Chinese-owned MG will need to be a lot lighter on its feet if it’s to win over the British motorist

Price: £14,995
Top speed: 112mph
0-62mph: 9.9 seconds
MPG: 53.2
CO2: 141g/km

What does MG conjure up to you? A classic 50s roadster, or maybe a sexy 60s two-seater – all burnished chrome and wire wheels? Chances are you are not thinking of a budget crossover with a passing resemblance to a Qashqai. But that’s what MG is today.

The GS is one of a growing number of cars known as ‘Chinese takeaways’

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As the UK plans to phase out petrol cars, is Australia being left behind?

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Britain has joined France and India in trying to ban the sale of diesel and petrol cars, but some say Australia’s size makes the transition too difficult

It is only a matter of time until every Australian car is all-electric. But while other countries are speeding up the transition, with plans to ban petrol cars within a couple of decades, Australia is stuck debating even modest cuts to vehicle emissions, let alone policies to encourage zero-emissions cars.

But as the UK, France, India and other countries move quickly towards getting all petrol cars off the roads, could Australia’s fleet be caught up in the winds of change?

Related: Queensland to build one of the world’s longest electric vehicle highways

Related: Britain to ban sale of all diesel and petrol cars and vans from 2040

Related: Electric cars: everything you need to know

Related: Auto industry fights back at plan to cut cars’ greenhouse gas emissions

Continue reading…

As the UK plans to phase out petrol cars, is Australia being left behind?

http://ift.tt/2eXLiKZ

Britain has joined France and India in trying to ban the sale of diesel and petrol cars, but some say Australia’s size makes the transition too difficult

It is only a matter of time until every Australian car is all-electric. But while other countries are speeding up the transition, with plans to ban petrol cars within a couple of decades, Australia is stuck debating even modest cuts to vehicle emissions, let alone policies to encourage zero-emissions cars.

But as the UK, France, India and other countries move quickly towards getting all petrol cars off the roads, could Australia’s fleet be caught up in the winds of change?

Related: Queensland to build one of the world’s longest electric vehicle highways

Related: Britain to ban sale of all diesel and petrol cars and vans from 2040

Related: Electric cars: everything you need to know

Related: Auto industry fights back at plan to cut cars’ greenhouse gas emissions

Continue reading…